The Pirates of Penzance

As one of most popular of Gilbert and Sullivan’s operettas, The Pirates of Penzance is one of those most commonly referred to in popular culture.  It’s difficult to say whether, however,  H.M.S. Pinafore, The Pirates of Penzance or The Mikado receives the most cultural references.

References to The Pirates of Penzance can be quite modern, including the following 2010 take in which President Obama is told that he’s of not living up to the country’s expectations.  In response, he breaks into song, to the tune of “I Am the Very Model of a Modern Major General.”  

The most famous popular cultural reference to The Pirates of Penzance, however, may be Tom Lehrer’s “The Elements” song, written in 1959, and sung to the tune of “I Am the Very Model of a Modern Major General.”  

Babylon 5

Along with the world of science, the many worlds of science fiction seem to have an affinity to Gilbert and Sullivan.  During the fourth season of Babylon 5, in an episode titled, “Atonement,” Captain Sheridan sends Marcus Cole and Dr. Stephen Franklin on a long, slow mission to Mars.  In order to pass the time, and to irritate his fellow passenger, Marcus sings “I am the very model of a modern Major General” to Dr. Franklin’s discontent.

It is somewhat surprising that British native Jason Carter misquoted Gilbert and Sullivan as he did.  It is, of course, the “fights,” and not the “facts” historical.  His shifts in key are, perhaps, more forgivable.  One should, by the way, listen to the song through the credits.  It’s the best part!

Star Trek: The Next Generation

In the fifth season of Star Trek: The Next Generation’s “Disaster” episode, Dr. Crusher is apparently casting a shipboard production of The Pirates of Penzance.  She asks Lieutenant Commander Geordi La Forge to sing.  He is reluctant but eventually does so, singing “I am the very model of a modern Major General …” in tuneless monotone, after which Dr. Crusher immediately casts him in the role.  If Geordi’s mediocre, half-hearted audition wins him the leading role in the operetta, one has to wonder about the rest of the cast and the quality of the production.

Frasier

There were multiple references to Gilbert and Sullivan in the Frasier television series.

In They’re Playing Our Song, the thirteenth episode of the seventh season, which aired on January 13, 2000, Frasier proposes a new theme song for his radio show.  

Although it’s not included in the video, Daphne Moon comments on Frasier’s theme song with the response, “It’s like Gilbert and Sullivan, only frightening.“

In Fathers and Sons, the twenty-second episode of the tenth season, which aired on May 6, 2003, Frasier, Niles, and Leland Barton sing “I am the Very Model of a Modern Major General” together, leaving Martin to wonder if Leland, his wife’s research assistant, could be his boys’ father.

Later in the episode, Martin, who is reassured that Frasier and Niles are his sons, enters their home, sees the two together at the piano and proudly says, “My boys.”  Then, when they begin singing “Willow, Titwillow,” and exasperated Martin puts on his headphones and turns on the television.

The West Wing

Writer, Producer and Actor Aaron Sorkin is a well-known Gilbert and Sullivan fan.  In The West Wing, his series about the lives of President Bartlet’s White House staff, the episode titled “And It’s Surely to Their Credit,” included the story of Republican attorney Ainsley Hayes who was asked to join the otherwise Democratic staff, much to the chagrin of the man who was to be her supervisor, White House Counsel Lionel Tribbey.  While, no doubt, a brilliant attorney, Lionel appears to have a somewhat incomplete knowledge of Gilbert and Sullivan …

The best line in the argument over whether “He is an Englishman” is from H.M.S. Pinafore, The Pirates of Penzance or Iolanthe, of course, is when Ainsley states, in regards to Gilbert and Sullivan’s operettas, “They’re all about duty!”

Later in the episode, after Ainsley has had a rough first day on the job, her colleagues kindly surprise her with a Gilbert and Sullivan themed welcome to the White House team.

In addition, the West Wing included a number of other Gilbert and Sullivan references.  While attending college, Sam Seaborn, Deputy White House Communications Director, had been the Recording Secretary of the Princeton University Gilbert and Sullivan Society.

In the Mandatory Minimums episode, Sam discovers that someone he trusted was actually trying to dupe him.  In a conversation with his supervisor, Communications Director Toby Zeigler, the following Pirates of Penzance themed exchange takes place:

Sam:  “He’s trying to practice on my … my …”
Toby:  “Credulous simplicity?”

In the Lord John Marbury episode, White House Press Secretary C.J. Crege describes Lord John as “the Earl of Sherbourne, he is the great great grandson of a former Viceroy and for thirteen years served as the Queen’s minister to either India or Pakistan.  Lord Marbury is here to counsel the President, and if you think this is all starting to sound like a Gilbert and Sullivan operetta, I don’t blame you a bit.”

Finally, in the Inauguration Part I episode President Bartlet described Deputy White House Communications Director Will Baily’s father as “the very model of a modern Major General.”

Mad About You

Mad About You is a sitcom that aired from 1992 to 1999.  The show starred Paul Reiser, as Paul Buchman, and Helen Hunt, as Jamie Stemple Buchman, a newly married couple in New York City.  The series focused on the newlyweds dealing with everything from humorous daily minutiae to major struggles.  In Season 6, Episode 5, titled “Moody Blues,” Paul is directing his parents in a production of The Pirates of Penzance for charity.  The rehearsal scenes can be seen at the 3:30, 4:25 and 8:10 minute marks, while the performance occurs at the 16:25 minute mark.  The performance includes some impromptu “alternate lyrics” when Paul’s father forgets the words to “I Am the Very Model of a Modern Major General.”  It should also be noted that Paul and Jamie also sing alternate lyrics about the show’s credits at the 20:35 minute mark!

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Hamilton

Hamilton is the extraordinarily popular Broadway musical about the life of American Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, with music, lyrics and book by Lin-Manuel Miranda.  The show was inspired by the 2004 biography Alexander Hamilton, by historian Ron Chernow, and has achieved both critical acclaim and box office success.  In Act I, General George Washington enters and sings, “Right-Hand Man,” during which he states, “Now I’m the model of a modern major general, the venerated Virginian veteran whose men are all lining up to put me up on a pedestal.”  This line can be heard at the 1:25 minute mark.

Chariots of Fire

The 1981 film, Chariots of Fire includes multiple Gilbert and Sullivan references.  The protagonist, Harold Abrahams, is a devoted Gilbert and Sullivan fan.  Abrahams sings “With Catlike Tread,” from The Pirates of Penzance, accompanying himself on the piano, during the channel crossing to Paris before the Olympic Games.  Chariots of Fire also features “He is an Englishman” from H.M.S. Pinafore, “The Soldiers of Our Queen” from Patience, “Three Little Maids from School Are We” from The Mikado and “There Lived a King” from The Gondoliers.

The Animaniacs

The Animaniacs was Steven Spielberg’s animated comedy television series, which aired on from 1993 to 1998.  Featuring three main characters, Yakko, Wakko and Dot, it was a variety show, with short skits, music, character catchphrases, and humor directed at an adult audience.

One episode from the first season was titled, H.M.S. Wakko / Slappy Goes Walnuts / Yakko’s Universe and included a parody of “I am the Very Model of a Modern Major General,” rendered as “I am the Very Model of a Cartoon Individual.”  The episode also included allusions to “With Cat Like Tread” and “Away, Away,” as well as musical allusions to H.M.S. Pinafore.

Mickey, Donald, Goofy: The Three Musketeers

The 2004 Disney film, Mickey, Donald, Goofy: The Three Musketeers, was an animated adaptation of Alexandre Dumas novel, The Three Musketeers.  The film was a musical comedy which included parodied version of famous pieces, including works by Strauss, Offenbach, Grieg and Bizet, as well as Sullivan.  The L’Opera portion of the film featured part of the overture to Princess Ida and four songs from The Pirates of Penzance, including With Catlike Tread, Poor Wandering One, Climbing Over Rocky Mountain and I Am the Very Model of a Modern Major General.

Family Guy

In the Death Has a Shadow episode, Brian the dog sings a brief snippet from “Sighing Softly to the River.”

Car 54, Where Are You?

During the Christmas at the 53rd episode of Car 54, Where Are You?, broadcast in December 1961, in which the police officers put on a Christmas review, Officer Francis Muldoon sings “A Policeman’s Lot Is Not a Happy One.”  Many will better remember Officer Muldoon actor, Fred Gwynne, from his role as Herman Munster, in The Munsters television series that ran from 1964 to 1966.  

Parodies of “I Am the Very Model of a Modern Major General”

“I Am the Very Model of a Modern Major General” may be the most popularly parodied Gilbert and Sullivan song.  Alternate lyric versions have been written in regards to Biblical Scholars …

… Psychopharmacologists …

… Boy Scout merit badges …

… and Network Television, to name only a few!

Mass Effect 2

Yet another reference to “I Am the Very Model of a Modern Major General” occurs in the action role-playing video game, Mass Effect 2, sung by Salarian scientist Mordin Solus.

Pretty Woman

In the 1990 film, Pretty Woman, the character of Edward Lewis, played by Richard Gere, engages a prostitute named Vivian Ward, played by Julia Roberts, to portray his girlfriend for an extended period of time for business purposes.  As the two unexpectedly grow closer, Edward takes Vivian to see a production of La Traviata.  Vivian is moved to tears by the story of the prostitute who falls in love with a rich man, which further deepens Edward’s feelings towards her.  After the opera, a fellow audience member asks Vivian how she liked the opera.  She replies, “It was so good, I almost peed my pants.”  Edward quickly covers for her saying that she had said that she “liked it better than Pirates of Penzance.”

Mars Trilogy

Kim Stanley Robinson’s award winning science fiction trilogy, “Red Mars,” “Green Mars” and “Blue Mars” envisions the colonization of Mars. In chapter 12 of Red Mars, the narrator describes the creation of genetically engineered plants to aid in Mars’ terraforming. He describes the process of synthesizing organisms, using various DNA strands with desirable traits. As the final step in the process, the selected cells receive a “short, sharp, shock” of electricity to bring them to life. In chapter 3 of Blue Mars, the socially inept, but brilliant Martian colonist physicist Saxifrage “Sax” Russell reflects on the fact that he has acquired a large following of young scientists who have been called “Saxi-clones,” all of whom admire him as “the very model of the modern Martian scientist.” Are these intentional quotes from The Mikado and The Pirates of Penzance or are they simply phrases that Mr. Robinson had heard … somewhere? Either way, they stand as a testimony to Gilbert and Sullivan’s pervasive influence in popular culture.

Dr. Who

Gilbert and Sullivan references can be cleverly or unexpectedly placed in modern contexts. Sometimes they’re just silly. In that spirit, we give you the Daleks singing selections from The Pirates of Penzance and The Mikado.